Digital Narrative Games

In class, we were introduced to digital narrative games. The first one I tried was spent (http://playspent.org/). It is about an adult who is almost bankrupt and tries to survive a month. You are put in a position to try to make smart decisions to try to make money and get through this month. You pay rent, take jobs, have a child, and try to juggle all of that. Every decision you take seems to be the most essential and no matter how smart you think it is, it always seems to have a worse consequence. It felt very frustrating. This game was my personal best of all Digital Narrative games and thought it needs no improvements.
The second one was being put in the shoes of a Syrian refugee (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-32057601) and try to escape this war and go to Europe through smugglers. This game appealed to me emotionally as I felt how refugees struggle to escape their destructed loved homes to go literally anywhere by terrible transportation methods that are very unsafe and they have to hide their identities and all the family of all ages are subjected to this horrible experience. However, the game itself could have offered more situations and be a bit longer.
The third one was The Depression Quest (http://www.depressionquest.com/). Its about a guy who is clearly suffering from depression who has to deal with his outgoing girlfriend, non-understanding mother, and more successful brother. I felt sorry for the poor guy who is battling from depression; this is an important topic that needs more awareness and to be taken care of because of the increase in suicide rates. Honestly, this was game was my least favorite. It contained lots of texts that expressed everything in detail that made it boring. (But, it wasn’t supposed to be a cheerful game anyway).
The fourth one was Responsible Partying (https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1FUGGJrxTjq9YnmcRGJKG_CsX1npnBy9LpSrlYVAgiNE/mobilepresent?pli=1&slide=id.p). This game was about how a party could go wrong of one isn’t responsible. Alcohol, sex, and driving while drunk are all outcomes of irresponsible partying. Playing this game made me feel disgusted of how wrong a party could go. And, I could personally relate to the importance of this issue as partying became a trend in Egypt. Nowadays, a bunch of 14 year-olds’ night out is at bars or clubs and the alcohol is everywhere. This game needs to be introduced in school classes as this trend needs to reach an end. But for this game to attract a teenager’s attention, it needs to be more technically advanced.
The last one was about Gender Equality in Egypt (https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/126ZOr6ev-g29F8ND9UBnuKTTmO0bGts7NVm9qlz4VGY/edit#slide=id.p) and this game travels a female Egyptian through time since being a toddler to an adult and how each phase girls are seen as inferior to men and are expected to act a certain way. Playing this game felt very relatable as I see it everyday growing up in Egypt. No part of it sounded exaggerative, but in fact, unfortunately true. It had left me wondering how females are treated in lower classes in Egypt and how they are never given a chance to be who they are, but follow the social norms blindly without the right to speak up. (This game also might need to be technically advanced).

All digital narrative games have had an effect on me and I have enjoyed almost all of them and I had played extra ones as well. They all express a spread issue and put you in the shoes of the one struggling where you have to make smart decisions. These types of games are all very creative and educational at the same time. You get to have a glimpse of an experience you might haven’t faced and feel empathy towards others. Throughout each game I have learned that everyone is going through something and that decisions are vital.

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